Asked and Answered


    Palliative Care

    A decision to begin palliative care takes in many factors. Ideally the decision includes a discussion with the health care team, who can offer information about options and available support. Several questions can help determine when palliative care becomes the main focus of care: What options are available for treatment? What does the person... read more...
    Decisions about palliative care must distinguish between a general palliative care approach and palliative care services, which often have limited resources. A palliative approach to care is broadly aimed at ensuring comfort and quality of life for people with a life-threatening illness. Ideally, this approach is an integral part of supporting... read more...
    Canada has universal health care, which provides basic health care without user fees. Yet the provinces control health care, and some charge a fee to access the health system. Palliative care is a basic service in all provinces and territories, so there’s no charge for palliative care in a hospital. Provincial and territorial governments usually... read more...
    The terms " palliative care " and "hospice" mean different things to different people. Here, "hospice" is taken to mean a facility that provides an alternative home for people living with a terminal illness. These people need a community, home-like environment and specialized care, yet their care isn’t so complex that it requires a hospital. read more...
    “One of the most difficult times for anyone is when a loved one is dying or at risk of death. The demands of caring for a gravely ill family member can jeopardize both your job and the financial security of your family. The Government of Canada believes that, during such times, you should not have to choose between keeping your job and caring... read more...
    Several factors determine the best place for providing care to a person with a terminal illness. This type of decision requires a balance between patient and family needs, and the availability of resources to meet those needs. Patient and family considerations include the following: patient and family preference; physical ability to handle... read more...